As discussed in a previous post, Backlog Refinement is a workshop held to take large backlog items and slice them down into smaller pieces. More specifically, we discussed the three major goals of Backlog Refinement:

  1. Estimate backlog items that have no estimate
  2. Correct estimates that appear to be considerably off target
  3. Discuss backlog items and divide them into smaller component pieces (slicing).

As already discussed (click here for the previous blog post), Backlog Refinement is a workshop held to take large backlog items and slice them down into smaller pieces. More specifically, we discussed the three major goals of Backlog Refinement:

  1. Estimate backlog items that have no estimate
  2. Correct estimates that appear to be considerably off target
  3. Discuss backlog items and divide them into smaller component pieces (slicing).

One of the things that I've noticed in my coaching of Scrum teams is how difficult it is to do effective backlog refinement. So, I thought I might release a series of short blog posts focused on backlog refinement, what it is and how it works. The first installment, "What is Backlog Refinement?" appears below. Enjoy!

Let me say from the outset that metrics, in any form, have more potential to do great harm than to do even the slightest good. To be clear, we're talking about metrics that measure operations and performance, not numbers that measure the size of something. For example, when we express the complexity of a user story, we discuss "story points." This is a measurement of size, not an operational metric of performance. On the other hand, when we add all those story points together for the stories completed in a sprint, we have "velocity" a (questionable) metric dealing with performance.

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